TAG taken over by UWF art teacher in first exhibition

By Morgan Givens
Staff Writer

Variety with a common message: that is how featured artist Marzia Ransom’s Ars Musae was described — the first art exhibition of the fall semester which has been showcased in the Center for Fine Performing Arts at the University of West Florida from July to early September.

Ars Musae, which is “muses of the arts” in Latin, is the title of the Artist Residency project, which is the first of eight exhibitions over the course of this school year. What sets the residency apart from the other exhibitions is that the gallery begins as an open space for the artist to work over the summer months.

“When I first began the residency program, my hope was to give local artists a space to work,” said Nick Croghan, director of The Art Gallery, “The residency was meant to be an open studio where the local community can come in and see the artist’s process, and Marzia was very open to that idea.”

The Art Gallery, popularly known as TAG, has seven more art exhibitions planned for the rest of the school year. (Photo by Morgan Givens) The Center of Fine Performing Arts has a full calendar of events for this semester ranging from arts, music, and theatre. You can view these events at http://uwf.edu/cfpa/  (Photo by Morgan Givens) Ransom’s work focused on ancient Greek author Homer and his poem The Odyssey, and the women’s role in the story. (Photo by Morgan Givens) Ransom’s painting “Women of the Odyssey” which portrayed the women Odysseus encountered in his epic journey, taking two months to complete. (Photo by Morgan Givens) “The Goddess” is an installation style work of art. Ransom portrays this specific piece as conceptual dress representing the Greek goddess Athena. The design of the work also pays homage to UWF, being constructed in a nautilus spiral shape. (Photo by Morgan Givens) “Penelope’s Shroud” is a mixed media piece, constructed of gold flake material, acetate, and lame. (Photo by Morgan Givens) Secluded away from the other works, “Her Journey” conveys the determination and undying faith of Penelope in the Odyssey. (Photo by Morgan Givens) An alternative view of “Her Journey” that gives a closer perspective to the tedious work done by Penelope on her journey without her husband Odysseys. (Photo by Morgan Givens) Ars Musae, the first art exhibition, was on display from July 16 to Sept. 7. (Photo by Morgan Givens) Ransom gave an address about her art her experience of being resident artist to a crowd on the final night of Ars Musae, which was Sept. 7. (Photo by Morgan Givens) Featured artist Marzia Ransom, has been putting her gallery together over the course of two months as the resident artist. (Photo by Morgan Givens)
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“The Goddess” is an installation style work of art. Ransom portrays this specific piece as conceptual dress representing the Greek goddess Athena. The design of the work also pays homage to UWF, being constructed in a nautilus spiral shape. (Photo by Morgan Givens)

Ransom, who was born in Italy, earned her first degree in graphic design and photography then received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in studio art from UWF. After earning a master’s degree in painting and photography at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, she moved back to Pensacola and is now an instructor in the CFPA. Her resume grew even more when she was chosen to be the resident artist this year.

“I was honored,” Ransom said. “I had the chance to showcase a body of work that was both cohesive and gorgeous. And I was really excited.”

The four pieces of work shown were all different in their style and how they were created, but had a clear theme, defined by Ransom, who stated she strived to incorporate a message in all her work. Upon walking into the gallery, the first thing guests see is a plaque with a biography of Ransom as well as her message, which tells how the perspective of the female characters in the Greek poem, The Odyssey, inspired her art.

Ransom also discussed the strength of willpower and said she aims to inspire women, especially her daughters Lilly and Maeci.

“[My daughters] have been a big part of everything I’ve done,” Ransom said, “and without their support I would never be able to do this.”

The final night of the exhibition was on Friday, Sept. 7, which concluded with an address by Ransom herself and a chance for guests to view her work for the last time.

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