Opinion: Valentine’s Day is an overemphasized holiday

By Taylor Hall
Staff Writer

Roses, chocolates, and big stuffed bears. Valentine’s day is the kick in the head that makes you “prove” your love to your significant other. But is a date on the calendar really a reason to spoil one another?

Valentine’s Day is widely celebrated and full of expectations and pressure. Some may see the holiday as a scheme set up by businesses to sell cards and chocolates, but the real origin is actually unknown. A popular belief is that the holiday is a day to celebrate St. Valentine.

St. Valentine was known for performing secret weddings after Emperor Claudius II outlawed marriage when he discovered that single men made greater soldiers. St. Valentine was sentenced to death once Claudius discovered his deception on Feb. 14, which in time became our well-known Valentine’s Day.

The UWF Library spread the love with this Valentine’s-themed table. Photo by Taylor Hall.

Today’s Valentine’s Day is now far removed from the memorial of a saint. Instead, it is a day set aside to overwhelm and publicly announce your love and devotion to your significant other. Just this year, $18.2 billion was spent on Valentine’s Day, according to Prosper Insights and Analytics.

“Valentine’s Day shouldn’t be the only day that you celebrate with your significant other,” Adam Morris, a public relations senior, said. “To celebrate Valentine’s Day is to celebrate your relationship, not just the other person.”

Spoiling your loved one should be an everyday occurrence. You shouldn’t need a holiday to show how much someone means to you.

“I think that it’s an awesome excuse to sit around and eat chocolate with the people you love,” Tiffani Johnson, an advertising junior, said. “That’s all we really need: chocolate and love.”

Valentine’s Day is a great excuse to be with your significant other and eat a box of chocolates, but the pressure to spend all your time and money on a gift or one night has gotten out of hand. It doesn’t have to be spent with a significant other specifically; it can be spent with anyone you love.

Hylene Rascheriz, a criminal justice junior, said she used the day to celebrate with friends and other loved ones.

It doesn’t matter if you spent Valentine’s Day alone, with your significant other, or surrounded by friends and family; it’s nothing more than an overemphasized holiday encouraging couples to outdo one another.